Dyslexia Stories 3

How can we discover other people’s dyslexia stories?

This is the 3rd in a series of 9 blog posts by an adult member of Dyslexia Scotland that explore dyslexia stories or journeys.  In the previous blog post we explored what dyslexia stories are and how they are helpful.  In this blog post and the one that follows it, we will discuss the 2nd key point of our series, namely other people’s dyslexia stories.  We will do this through the question ‘How can we discover other people’s dyslexia stories?’

We can discover other people’s dyslexia stories:

1)    In person; and through

2)    video; and

3)    audio.

Here are some examples.

1. Discovering other people’s dyslexia stories in person

By ‘in person’ I mean communication that takes place in a shared physical space like a room or train, rather than on social media.

  1. Dyslexia Scotland meetings e.g. adult network, local branches
  2. Dyslexia Awareness Week events such as the ones that featured Sam Barclay and Paul McNeill at http://www.dyslexiascotland.org.uk/sites/default/files/page_content/ECLDAW2014FinalProgramme29.9.14.pdf
  3. Lexxic meet-ups – see http://www.lexxic.com/meetup
  4. Meetings you organise independently e.g. informal ones with dyslexic friends or people you have met through dyslexia meetings and events

2. Discovering other people’s dyslexia stories through video

  1. ‘Dyslexia’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErValSbWrZE

This film on the Dyslexia Scotland YouTube channel tells the dyslexia story of Sir Jackie Stewart.

2. ‘My Dyslexia Story’ http://www.klairedelys.com/2013/07/19/my-dyslexia-story

  • Scroll down to the second black box entitled ‘MY DYSLEXIA STORY’
  • In this video Klaire de Lys tells her story directly to the camera

3. Erin Brokovich http://www.makers.com/moments/kindness-one-teacher and

http://www.makers.com/moments/dyslexia-does-not-mean-dumb

  • Erin Brokovich is the main character in a film of that name. She is also a real person who is an environmental activist and dyslexic
  • In these powerful video clips the real Erin talks to the camera about her dyslexic experiences in primary school

4. The 1In5 Initiative’s ‘Being the One Videos Gallery’ http://explore1in5.org/what-is-dyslexia/reading-support/being-the-one-videos

  • The 1In5 Initiative is a self-help dyslexia website run by an audiobook provider in the US, Learning Ally
  • To date, there are over 20 dyslexia stories on the 1In5’s video gallery
  • A wide range of ages is represented in these videos

3. Discovering other people’s dyslexia stories through audio

  1. The Codpast https://thecodpast.wordpress.com/the-codpast
  • The Codpast is a website which offers a series of podcasts free of charge. A new podcast is added every month
  • In the podcasts, dyslexics are interviewed about their experiences. The interviews are very instructive because the interviewees say how they have overcome their difficulties and succeeded.
  • The interviewer is dyslexic, so his questions are informed by his own knowledge and experience of dyslexia
  • I find the conversational format of these interviews makes their content very accessible

In this blog post we have been starting our discussion of the 1st key point of this series, namely other people’s dyslexia stories. We have done this by exploring 3 ways in which we can discover other people’s dyslexia stories. You can remember them by visualising yourself in a dyslexia storytelling convention. There are 3 rooms:

  1. One room has lots of people in it. They are sitting in a circle, telling each other their stories
  2. Another room has a video booth filming people as they tell their story
  3. A 3rd room has a recording studio, making audio recordings of people’s story.

Now imagine a 4th room with a large table that people are sitting round, writing their dyslexia stories. This mental image leads us to the next blog post where we will look at how we can discover other people’s dyslexia stories through the written word.

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Dyslexia Stories 2

Dyslexia Stories 2

This is the 2nd of 9 posts by an adult member of Dyslexia Scotland. (Please scroll down for earlier posts in ‘Dyslexia Stories’).

What are dyslexia stories and how can they help people?

The first blog post in this series introduced the series and gave an overview of its content.  We are now going to discuss our first key point, phrased as the question ‘What are dyslexia stories and how can they help people?’

A. What are dyslexia stories?

A dyslexia story, or dyslexia journey, is a dyslexic’s account of their experiences as a dyslexic.  It describes the effects of dyslexia on their life, for example in learning, work and personal life.

B. How can dyslexia stories help?

1. Dyslexia stories give dyslexics a sense of belonging

There is a book entitled ‘The dyslexic adult in a non-dyslexic world’.  This phrase conveys how I often feel – isolated and at odds with the world.  However, when I hear other dyslexics talk about their experiences, I feel that I belong – not to the world, but to a group within it.  Many dyslexics are excellent storytellers.  They can talk about their dyslexia journey vividly and passionately.  Their stories inspire me and give me hope.

2. Dyslexia stories help people to accept your dyslexia

Retelling other people’s dyslexia stories might normalise dyslexia for people around you.  In other words, telling people you know about other people’s dyslexia might help them to accept yours.  It lets them see that you are not the only one with dyslexia.

3. Dyslexia stories raise dyslexia awareness

Dyslexia stories:

  • give people who do not have dyslexia an idea of what life can be like for dyslexics;
  • let people see how the nature and impact of dyslexia can vary from individual to individual.

This blog post has:

  • explained what a ‘dyslexia story’ or ‘dyslexia journey’ is; and
  • explored how dyslexia stories can help people

In our next blog post we will start discussing our 2nd key point, phrased as the question ‘How can we discover other people’s dyslexia stories?’

References

  1. Ellen Morgan and Cynthia Klein: ‘The dyslexic adult in a non-dyslexic world’. Published by John Wiley & Sons, 2000. ISBN 978-1861562074.

Dyslexia Stories 1

Dyslexia stories 1

Introduction and Overview

This is the first of 9 posts by an adult member of Dyslexia Scotland.

A. Introduction 

I would like to share with you some information and ideas on dyslexia stories. To do this, I have written a series of blog posts which will be posted in sequence here on the Dyslexia Scotland blog. This 1st post comprises an overview of all 9 blog posts in the series.

B. Overview of entire series

The key discussion points of the ‘Dyslexia Stories’ series of blog posts are:

  • What dyslexia stories are and how they are helpful
  • Other people’s dyslexia stories
  • Your own dyslexia story

These 3 key points give us our overarching structure, and into it we put the following content:

Blog post(s) number(s) Content
1st key point: What dyslexia stories are and how they are helpful
2  – What are dyslexia stories?

– How can dyslexia stories help people?

2nd key point: Other people’s dyslexia stories
3 & 4 – How can we discover other people’s dyslexia stories?
3rd key point: Your own dyslexia story
5 – How can telling your dyslexia story help you and others?

– Sharing or not sharing your dyslexia story

6, 7, 8 & 9 – How can you tell your own dyslexia story?

This blog post has given the gist of the whole series.  Think of it as your contents page.  You may find it helpful to print it out and refer to it as you progress through the series.

In the next blog post, we will explore the first key point in our series with the following 2 questions:

A. What are dyslexia stories?

B. How can dyslexia stories help people?