Dyslexia Stories 7

Telling your dyslexia story on video or in audio

In the previous blog post we started exploring some of the ways you can tell your own dyslexia story.  We did that by looking at some opportunities to do so in person.  In this blog post, we are going to explore 2 more ways to tell your dyslexia story, namely on video and in audio.  See blog post 3 for further details of nos. A4, A5 and B1. 

A. Telling your dyslexia story on video:

1) Dyslexia Scotland

2)I am Dyslexic’ film

3) Make your own video recording

4) The 1In5 Initiative

5) Dyslexia Together

B. Telling your dyslexia story in audio:

1) The Codpast

2) Make your own audio recording

  • Tell your story onto an audio recording device
  • If you use a digital device, you can save it as an audio file and share it electronically e.g. on a blog, on DropBox or by email.
  • Your audio can be any length you like e.g. 3 minutes or an audiobook

I hope you are enjoying discovering different ways you can tell your dyslexia story. Just to recap, so far, in this blog post and the previous one, we have explored 3 ways you can tell your dyslexia story:

  • In person
  • Through video
  • In audio

The next and final 2 blog posts in this series might be the most exciting ones for some dyslexics because they are about being creative! In them, we will look at telling your dyslexia story through art, e-books, and the written word including creative writing.

Dyslexia Stories 6

Telling your dyslexia story in person

This is the 6th in a series of 9 blogs by a member of Dyslexia Scotland.

Our current discussion point in this blog series is telling your dyslexia story.  In the previous post we:

  • looked at the potential benefits of telling your dyslexia story; and
  • acknowledged that it is up to you whether you share your dyslexia story or not

In this blog post and the 3 that follow it, we are going to:

  • Revisit the ways other people have told their dyslexia stories that we looked at in blog posts 3 and 4. This time we will look at them from the perspective of you telling your own dyslexia story; and
  • Look at some other ways that you can tell your dyslexia story.

Some approaches apply to sharing your story. Others apply to keeping your story to yourself and potentially sharing it later.

In this blog post, we are going to look at the first of these approaches: telling your dyslexia story in person.

A. Telling your dyslexia story at meetings or events

It can be really helpful to tell other dyslexics your story because they may have had similar experiences, or be able to empathise with you (i.e. put themselves in your shoes) easily.

  1. Dyslexia Scotland meetings e.g. the Glasgow Adult Dyslexic Group has had a meeting each year for the past 2 years on ‘Members’ Dyslexia Experiences’. For details, see the section entitled ‘The Adult Network’ at http://www.dyslexiascotland.org.uk/adults

2. Dyslexia Awareness Week events

  • perhaps there would be an opportunity for you to speak at one of these

3. Lexxic meet-ups – see http://www.lexxic.com/meetup

4. Organise your own meetings e.g. invite a dyslexic friend or contact for a chat

B. Telling your dyslexia story in counselling

Talking to a counsellor can be helpful in a different way from talking to dyslexic peers. A counsellor might not have 1st-hand experience of dyslexia, but is trained to listen with empathy.

  1. If you have had dyslexia experiences that bother you, talking to a counsellor can help you come to terms with them
  2. Choosing to tell your story to a counsellor means you bare your soul to one person only, in a confidential environment. Your relationship with a counsellor is professional. This means that, compared to your personal contacts, counsellors are able to help you without emotional involvement acting as an obstacle
  3. If you are referred for counselling or another psychological therapy through the NHS, it will be free of charge
  4. For further information on the benefits of counselling for dyslexics see

5. For further information on counselling see:

In this, the 6th blog post in our series, we have started exploring some of the ways you can tell your own dyslexia story. We have done this by looking at ways you can share your dyslexia story with others in person. We have seen that this can be done at meetings or events and in counselling.

In the next blog post, we go on to explore 2 more ways you can tell your dyslexia story, namely on video and in audio.

References

  • 1) Vicki Goodwin and Bonita Thomson: ‘Making Dyslexia Work for You – A Self-help guide’. Published by David Fulton, 2004. ISBN 9 781843 120919. The page numbers in this blog post refer to the 2004 edition, although they may also apply to the 2nd edition, published in 2012.
  • 2) Robert McCormack: ‘Dyslexia and Mental Health – Exposing its poisonous roots’ in ‘Counselling in Scotland’, the journal of COSCA, Summer 2010, pages 4-7.

Dyslexia Stories 5

• How can telling your own dyslexia story help?
• Sharing or not sharing your dyslexia story

The 1st 4 blog posts in this series have discussed 2 key points, namely:
• What dyslexia stories are and how they can help people;
• Other people’s dyslexia stories

In our next 5 blog posts we are going to explore a 3rd key point: telling your own dyslexia story. To start, this post discusses:
• the benefits of telling your own dyslexia story; and
• sharing your story with others or keeping it to yourself

A. How can telling your dyslexia story help?
Here are some ways that telling your dyslexia story can help you and others. See also above in Section B of the blog post ‘Dyslexia Stories 2’.
1. It will externalise your thoughts, giving you greater clarity on your experience
2. It will increase your self-awareness which will lead you to accept yourself better
3. It will give you a point of reference and an opportunity to rehearse your story.

This will:
• enable you to explain your experiences more easily to others
• help others to understand you better
• make life a bit easier for you because you are less likely to be misunderstood by others

B. Sharing or not sharing your dyslexia story
You have 2 options:
1) You can share your story with as many or as few people as you want e.g. on a blog or in person; or
2) You can choose not to share your story with anyone else e.g. make an audio recording and keep it private. You can always share it at a later point if you change your mind

This blog post has:
• Shown us some potential benefits of telling your dyslexia story; and
• Pointed out that telling your dyslexia story is not the same as sharing it.

In the next blog post in our series, we will continue to look at our 3rd key point, telling your own dyslexia story. We will do this by starting to look at how you can tell your own dyslexia story.

Dyslexia Stories 4

Discovering other people’s dyslexia stories through the written word

This is the 4th in a series of 9 blog posts by an adult member of Dyslexia Scotland that explore dyslexia stories or journeys.

In the previous blog post in this series, we looked at how we can discover other people’s dyslexia stories in person, and through video and audio.  This blog post gives some ideas of where we can find dyslexia stories in the written word.

Here are 7 places where you can find people’s dyslexia stories in text.  You can use a text reader with all of them e.g. Ivona MiniReader, which is free.  To install it, go to: http://www.adapteddigitalexams.org.uk/Using-Digital-Papers/Reading-with-Text-to-Speech/Ivona-MiniReader

1. ‘Dyslexia and Us’ book http://www.dyslexiascotland.org.uk/sites/default/files/page_content/book_order_form.pdf

  • ‘Dyslexia and Us’ is a collection of over 100 accounts of dyslexia by a wide variety of people
  • It is produced by Dyslexia Scotland and Edinburgh City Libraries
  • The stories are short – at most a few pages

2. Dyslexia Scotland blog https://alifelessordinaryds.wordpress.com

3. Dyslexia Action’s ‘It’s Me’ http://www.dyslexiaaction.org.uk/its-me

  • This page on the Dyslexia Action website shows dyslexia stories that people have submitted to it
  • Some of the stories have images
  • Click on the title of each story for the full story

4. Dyslexia Together’s ‘Other People’s Stories’ http://www.dyslexiatogether.org.uk/other-peoples-stories.html

  • Dyslexia Together is a self-advocacy website
  • The stories on this webpage are all exclusively text but they include links to websites and videos
  • There are 9 stories to date. 7 are by adults and 2 by young adults

5. Klaire de Lys: ‘My Dyslexia Story’ http://www.klairedelys.com/2013/07/19/my-dyslexia-story

  • Klaire de Lys’ dyslexia story in text (it is also available in video on the same webpage, below the text)
  • Many other people have added their stories to this webpage below the video (scroll down to the comments)

6. RASP guest blog http://r-a-s-p.co.uk/guest-blog

  • These posts are all dyslexia stories by writers and other creatives

7. Susan Barton dyslexia stories http://susanbartondyslexiastories.com

  • These are emails that a variety of people have sent to a US dyslexia specialist, Susan Barton
  • Susan has published them in order to help people grasp the impact of dyslexia across the life span
  • The emails all have an audio toolbar at the top but of the several I tried, only one actually played audio

In the 1st 4 posts in this series of blog posts we have been exploring our 1st 2 key points of the series:

  •  What dyslexia stories are and how they can help people;
  • Other people’s dyslexia stories

Now what about your own dyslexia story? How do you feel about telling it? How do you think telling it might help you and others? In the rest of the blog posts in this series we are going to think about our 3rd and final key point, namely your own dyslexia story. We will explore:

  • Some ways in which telling your own story can help you and others;
  • The question of sharing or not sharing your story; and
  • Some ways in which you can tell your story

References

‘Dyslexia and Us’

  • Kindle edition published by AUK Authors, 2013. ASIN: B00F4ZNPBC
  • Paperback edition ISBN 978-1-906401-36-8