Organisation & Time Management: Most Dyslexics’ Second/Third Nightmare!

At a recent Dyslexia Scotland Adult Network (Stirling) Meeting, we were discussing how difficult it is to organise our lives and homes on top of jobs, studying and/or family life.

These problems are by no means limited to us dyslexics (but our non-linear [often nonverbal] brains don’t help matters). I have also recently joined some local stitching clubs, and it was a friend in one of these that gave me the following idea. She said that she rewards herself monetarily for the tasks she does each day.

I thought this was a great idea and started using her idea. I reward myself 1p for things like every page I read, every 30mins I walk, every item I iron, and every item I put away in a drawer or hang up (I used to have huge piles of clothes everywhere because I thought, I’d forget anything I couldn’t see).

The following is a photo of how I keep a record of what I have done each day:

doreen_blog_photo

I have found this can be a good way to plan out a day. Without having to time everything out (which is something I cannot do, I don’t seem to know how long things will/should take me to do). I have found if I am having trouble starting in the morning: I get the pad out and write out a table, listing the tasks I have been putting off or I know need doing. And then somehow it’s a wee bit easier to get started.

AND yes I know the lines aren’t straight! I gave up trying to use a ruler, it was just too much hassle. And it’s not like anyone else will need to see it (other than an outside chance I feel the need to show my husband).

Also, due to the fact that I also reward myself for every room I hoover, or every window I wash, or every piece of furniture I polish; I can keep track of how often and/or frequently I do these tasks, that aren’t daily tasks but need done on a semi regular basis. So, if I’m sitting thinking about when I last did a task, I can just flip back and get a definite answer.

I can see how some people may feel this is a bit like a child’s reward chart. But it works with kids doesn’t it? Why should we have to grow out of everything that helps! No one else needs to know. And it can be a way to save for treats that you otherwise cannot justify (I use 1ps because I’m temp and don’t always have a job: but the friend who told me about it uses other denominations [like 10p etc]).

Why not give this a go if you are having trouble organising your life. Perhaps if this doesn’t work for you, it might give you ideas about what else might help. Or if you use other techniques (or have other ideas) please comment below, we’d love to learn from your coping mechanisms.

Doreen Kelly

Admin Volunteer/DS Member

Harry Potter and the Magic of Accessible Books for All

I’ve never been a massive fan of Harry Potter. I watch the films and enjoy them, but I was discouraged from reading the books as a result of a teacher misjudging how long it would take to finish it, and consequently abandoned it partway through. Having said that, I think I was secretly glad given the miniscule size of the print. Following the announcement that the new play, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, is to be released in a dyslexia friendly format, it got me thinking about the other books. Should this version of the play take off, it will hopefully lead to an increase in titles being available for those who have dyslexia and other difficulties that may impair either the ability to read, or enjoyment of, reading.

It’s not all good news though. The first thing the Amazon listing says is that the new copy of the play is in a large print version. While this is obviously helpful for those who find it easier to read books with a bigger font, it is simplistic and naive to assume this will help all dyslexic readers. I’m not dyslexic myself, but I am visually impaired and the assumption that my difficulties with certain things would be fixed if only someone made the text bigger was a prevalent misconception throughout my schooling. As a consequence, I am very empathetic to the fact that learning difficulties and impairments are nuanced and shouldn’t all be lumped together.

For those who argue that technology can take care of formatting preferences, they are making several misguided assumptions. Firstly, that people can afford to buy such things. Secondly, they aren’t realising that technology can hinder people’s ability to access books due to Kindles etc. having an unlimited battery life and screen glare. Also, some people just prefer a book, and they should, where possible, have that option.

I appreciate that it is costly and impractical for countless different versions to be made and the fact that the publication is endorsed by the British Dyslexia Association should at least be encouraging. Below that pronouncement, however, is the text “Formatting may also aid readers with visual impairment, Parkinsons disease, Stroke, Multiple Sclerosis, brain injury and Cerebral Palsy. Also great for all readers with tired eyes after a long day!”

The implication is that this is the additional support needs copy of the book, which is disappointing as I personally can’t see how it will help people with all of those conditions. Having said that, there is a huge part of me that wants to applaud the publishers of the book, W. F. Howes Ltd. Making books accessible to all is an admirable endeavour, and in order to achieve that someone has to be brave enough to get the ball rolling.

Well, rolling on. We can’t forget Strawberry Classics or Barrington Stoke, specialist publishers who format books so they can be easily read by people who have dyslexia. Without belittling the importance of their work – it’s both tremendous and vital – it is, at least in some ways, a shame that specialised publishers need to exist in order for this need to be fulfilled. While it’s great that there are publishers who specialise in the production of accessible books for dyslexics, it’s a pity that there are not specialists within mainstream publishing houses too. If there were, titles, both classics and popular fiction, may be brought to a wider audience. Furthermore, I think the demand is there. One in ten people in the UK are believed to have dyslexia alone, and while I know there is not – nor should there be – a one size fits all approach to formatting – more can still be done (look at books that children and young people need to read in school, for instance).

The publication of the dyslexia friendly version of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is not just a step in the right direction, but something other publishers need to capitalise on for the benefit of not just their profit margins but those with additional support needs. As the Amazon advertisement illustrates, they are numerous and deserve to be recognised by mainstream publishers. In doing so, publishers would not only recognise the right that everyone has to be able to read, but also send the message that dyslexia shouldn’t stop people being able to access books, whether that be for enjoyment or necessity.

Gemma Bryant