The Adult Network: An Interconnected Patchwork of Blue Ribbons

On Saturday 2nd June I am looking forward to attending the big adult network meeting (where all 3 networks will come together). I will bring a display of my handcrafted blue ribbon badges. Although I do not feel I would be able to talk to the whole room about my creativity; please feel free to come and ask me about my work (if you’re coming too). I would ask one thing though, please, don’t worry if I take a moment to compose an answer to your questions as my processing speed is still a problem for me. And I am currently working on conquering my anxiety (which can arise when I’m trying to talk to people) when my anxiety and slow processing (related to my dyslexia) sabotage me at the same time I can dissolve into a jibbering mess. But as a former Brownie and Girl Guide I am not one to shrink from a challenge (I have, however, learned to take on realistic challenges rather trying to run before I can walk).

The photo above could be a classroom or stall display for Dyslexia Awareness Week. But I think its best feature is that it is made up of individual badges each individual could wear. The stars can all be untied from the central sunshine badge, also the blue diamonds which attach the big blue ribbon to the solar constellation can then be used on this own. As a display, worn as a scarf or a child’s sash (perhaps by a school’s/class’s Blue Ribbon Ambassador). The photo below shows an individual star badge and blue diamond badge. Some tying in of the “tiers” is required on the star badges, but I can show people how this can done (if my fingers will work when people are watching that is).

I will try to make as many blue ribbon badges and large blue ribbons as possible for my display as I know many of my fellow adult network members do a lot of good work with their local branches and may want supplies for this year’s DAW (Dyslexia Awareness Week: 5-10 November). And don’t worry, I agree with Ellie the brilliant young creator of the Dyslexia Scotland Blue Ribbons, blue should be free. Therefore, I will not be looking for payment for the blue ribbons. I have had displays of blue ribbons, badges at other events and people insisted on making donations, which I have passed on to Dyslexia Scotland (therefore if you see a collecting can at my stall – please don’t feel obliged to make a donation in order to take badges).

If you are interested in attending the all adult network meeting in Stirling on Saturday 2 June, please see our website for more details.  No need to book, just come along at 11am.

Doreen Kelly, Adult Network Member

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GDPR and Dyslexia

I only have a surface level understanding of the new GDPR regulations, but hope it will cut down on my semi-junk-mail (which contributes to my information overload). I just wish one particular organisation would get the message and stop sending me the ‘do you want to opt-in letters’ (I’m sure I’ve had at least 2 letters already).

I do however, like the idea of organisations having to ask people to opt-in on forms; as I am seriously sick of having to read the fine print beside those tick boxes so carefully (sometimes even having my husband double check for me). On one form one would be asked to tick if you WANT to receive information, the next would be tick if you DO NOT want junk mail and then there were the third set of forms that you would have needed a post-graduate law degree in contract writing to understand what you are agreeing to if you tick the box!

I found that wee bit at the bottom of store points cards forms etc (that one is expected to fill out in checkout queues or some other distracting and time limited situations) extremely annoying and a little disabling.

A bit like all the different chip-and-pin machines; some of which say ‘Please REMOVE your card’ while others say ‘Please DO NOT remove your card’. The number of times I’ve taken my card back when the instruction actually said the opposite, is embarrassing. Nowadays when I have to use my card, I ask the checkout assistant if I’ve to take my card when one of those statements appears on the wee screen.

I hope these new regulations stop all the letters and emails I get – which I rarely read, but I never quite know if I should throw away or not.

Hopefully organisations will be motivated to declutter their websites and adverts so that those who have not opted-in can find out about their goods and services (that the individual customer actually wants). I find it very difficult to navigate all these websites with lots of bells and whistles which hide the information I actually want. And I can too often tell the story of an advert (off the telly), but when asked what was the advert for, I’m at an absolute loss!

My final point on the introduction of the new GDPR law is that as per usual it’s ironic – organisations are having to send out mail-shots which may be treated like junk mail, by the recipients. I have had recent experience of this particular aspect of these new regulations, as in my temp job in a housing association, I volunteered to fold hundreds of letters to go out to all the tenants.

Anonymous

Do you want to find out more about GDPR? Click on the link below:

https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/resources-and-support/getting-ready-for-the-gdpr-resources/